Fossil fuel is non-renewable energy, that means it will run out a day in future no matter how much it is under our earth’s crust. But nowadays we still heavily rely on fossil fuel as our major energy source. We use fossil fuel ( petrol, natural gas, coal ) to generate energy, for transportation and making many daily-use product ( plastic bag, nylon, PVC and etc. ). Can you imagine what will happen when the fossil fuel is exhausted?

The primary method for producing electricity is simple. One heats water to the point it turns to steam. The steam is then pressurized and passed over a turbine fan. The fan spins a generator in the system and electricity is produced. This is the method used with nuclear power, hydropower, coal power and so on. The only issue is how you heat the water.

According to research by sustainable energy Clean Edge a leading research firm that tracks and analyzes clean-tech markets and trends production and wholesale pricing of biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel reached billion in and are projected to grow to in Clean Edge also estimates that wind power will expand from $51.4 billion in 2008 to $139.1 billion in 2018, and solar power will grow from $29.6 billion in 2008 to $80.6 billion in 2018.

The sun warming areas of the planet differently causes air masses to move as wind. And it’s the sun’s energy that evaporates the water that eventually falls as rain the fill the rivers and streams from which we harness hydropower.

Consider solar water heaters to make your home more energy efficient. This works best in areas where the temperature doesn’t drop below freezing. Solar energy systems circulate water through solar heaters and then pump it into the house. Though you can use this system, it’s best to have a regular water heater for backup purposes, just in case there is a day with little sunlight or more water usage than normal.

Set out a table of your electricity usage for each month by recording the kilowatt hours (kwh) usage in each month. If you have separate hot water metering record this as well.

This might be the only time you ever read about molten batteries in your life. The next time you read about your utility company buying electricity from a solar farm, this may be exactly what is involved.